Military Culture And Families

U.S. Navy Reserve. (n.d.). Retrieved from www.navyreserve.com

U.S. Coast Guard Reserve. (n.d.). Retrieved from www.uscg.mil/reserve/

Blaisure, K. R., Saathoff-Wells, T., Pereira, A., MacDermid Wadsworth, S., & Dombro, A. L. (2016). Serving military families (2nd ed.). New York: NY: Routledge.

Chapter 1, “An Introduction to Military Culture and Military Families”(Review pp. 7-9)

Chapter 2, “An Overview of Military Personnel and Their Families”(Review pp.29-33)

Schading, B., Schading, R., (2007). A civilian’s guide to the U.S. military: A comprehensive reference to the customs, language, & structure of the armed forces. Cincinnati, OH:Writers Digest.

Chapter 2, “Understanding the U.S. Army” (pp. 45–60)

Chapter 3, “Understanding the U.S. Navy” (pp. 76–86)

Chapter 4, “Understanding the U.S. Marine Corps” (pp. 102–108)

Chapter 5, “Understanding the U.S. Air Force” (pp. 120–126)

Faber, A. J., Willerton, E., Clymer, S. R., MacDermid, S. M., & Weiss, H. M. (2008). Ambiguous absence, ambiguous presence: A qualitative study of military reserve families in wartime. Journal of Family Psychology, 22(2), 222–230.

Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.

Griffith, J. (2011). Decades of transition for the US Reserves: Changing demands on reserve identity and mental well-being. International Review of Psychiatry, 23(2), 181–191.

Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.

Document: Military Branch Scenarios (PDF)

You select one of the scenarios in this document to address in this week’s Discussion post.

Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2013). Military culture and values [Video file]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 4 minutes.

Desmond Flanigan provides a brief overview of his experiences serving 27 years in the U.S. Army. He then describes how military training can help develop particular values and impart a particular culture to both military personnel and their families.

Accessible player –Downloads–Download Video w/CCDownload AudioDownload Transcript

Laureate Education (Producer). (2013). Military culture and identity [Video file]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 3 minutes.

Michael and Kristin Wilkinson describe military culture’s impact on their lifestyles and identities.

Accessible player –Downloads–Download Video w/CCDownload AudioDownload Transcript

Optional Resources

Schading, B., Schading, R., (2007). A civilian’s guide to the U.S. military: A comprehensive reference to the customs, language, & structure of the armed forces. Cincinnati, OH:Writers Digest.

Chapter 7, “Understanding the U.S. Special Operations Forces” (pp. 145–164)

This chapter is not required, but it does provide some important information about the Special Forces.

Discussion: Values and Perspectives

While many military personnel may internalize the core values of their perspective branches, not every service member does. Some personnel respect and embrace the values immediately, while others do so over time, and some never do. Some military personnel join, but leave after their first contract, while others remain in the service for many years. As a helping professional, you can expect clients in the military to reflect a wide range of commitment to military values and internalization of military culture. How might an internalization of and commitment to military values influence a service member’s identity? How might this internalization of a branch’s values contribute to the stressors the service member endures?

This week, as you have explored the military branches to increase your knowledge regarding the roles and responsibilities of military personnel, you may have also increased your understanding of the stressors associated with the military lifestyle. As you have deepened your understanding of military culture, you may also be aware of how your own perspective of the military, its members, and its mission may influence the way you, as a helping professional, view and interact with military personnel. For example, if you strongly oppose war, it may be challenging to work with military personnel who train to engage in war and who strongly identify with this role. Keep this self-awareness in mind as your prepare your Discussion post.

For this Discussion, read the scenarios in the “Military Branches Scenarios” document (refer to this week’s resources). Select one scenario to address in the Discussion.

By Day 3

Post one important fact each about two different military branches—explaining why this information is important for helping professionals to know.

Then, explain what challenges a helping professional whose views conflict with those espoused by the military might face when interacting with the service member in the scenario you selected. Finally, explain one strategy you, as a helping professional, might use to address these challenges.

Be sure to support your post with specific references to the resources. If you are using additional articles, be sure to provide full APA-formatted citations for your references.

 

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